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View Full Version : Did you ever use a BBS?



Harrison
9th May 2007, 11:00
With everyone now using the Internet and taking it for granted, it can sometimes be hard to believe that it has only been around in the current WWW browser based form since the release of Mosaic back in 1993. Before this the internet was a text based format that mainly consisted of users directly connecting to specific services, rather than being about to easily access, browse and search everywhere online as we can today.

Before the WWW based internet, did you use any online services? And especially BBS services? And even more interestingly, did you ever use them on an Amiga?

I personally never used a BBS on the Amiga :( as I didn't own my first modem until I purchased a new PC in 1998.

Before that I had used some BBS services in school connected from an Acorn BBC Master in the 1980's. I think they were mainly BBC school related services we connected to but I cannot remember. And I had connected and used a few BBS services from my friends house as his day had an early PC with a modem which we were sometimes allowed to use. I remember we connected to some gaming related BBS services that we got addresses for from magazines. A couple were general 8 16 bit gaming related and I do remember one being Atari ST and Amiga based. Not sure what they actually were called though.

After that I used the internet first the first time at college in the early 90's on a Mac :thumbsdown2: and then at university. It was great having access from the beginning of the browser based internet revolution as I saw it evolve first hand. :)

Demon Cleaner
9th May 2007, 11:39
I had a friend who used a modem to get games from some cracker groups, as he also was deeply envolved. But of course his parents took him the modem off, or restricted (they tried at least) its use. Back then it took almost an hour to get the copy of one amiga disk.

The first time I got in contact with the internet, was in a local shop, and then when I started to work where I am now in 1996. Since then I've been using it all day.

Merlin
9th May 2007, 12:02
Holy crap, now you are taking me back, 'boxing' your way onto the old BBS' at 9600 on a Hayes modem then eventually at up to 38400 with a US Robotics sportster... and all the old articles on blueboxing, blackboxing and roxboxing.

I have forgotten most of the old BBS names now, it's been too long...

Merlin

Submeg
9th May 2007, 13:38
I cant ever remember when I first used the net...

Stephen Coates
9th May 2007, 16:51
I think i first used a BBS about 2 months ago. It was a telnet one though.

Never connected to one over the telephone with a modem though.

First used the internet properly when i got my PC in 1999. I had seen the internet being used via CompuServe on a PowerBook. Not sure whether I actually used it though.

Puni/Void
10th May 2007, 07:12
I was never hooked on BBS's, as I preferred swapping (mail-trading) instead. ;) Have tried a few of them in the past though, can't deny that. That must have been in 1995, 1996 or around that time.

v85rawdeal
10th May 2007, 17:02
I didnt get to use anything like the internet at school or at any of the training courses I was on. It wasnt until 1994 I got to go online, because a friend of mine said I could come round and use his PC for the internet... Oh the luxury of dial-up, giving you time to get a drink whilst loading each webpage.

TiredOfLife
10th May 2007, 23:22
Never did use BBS
Surprising really as lot othe the early demos were available this way.
Was into demos in a big way.
Use to pick them up at computer markets and off magasine disks.

AlexJ
11th May 2007, 08:30
I didn't get onto the internet until it's second coming in 1998 (when the subscription was lifted and only charge was for call time). Since then of course with broadband, it's reversed so it's now there is a subscription again, but no call charges.

Harrison
11th May 2007, 09:20
During the dialup years I remember having to be carefully and needing to check the call logs to see how much I had spent each night to make sure I didn't spend too much.

Using Demon Internet they provided a utility called Turnpike that logged all your dialup activity. You could add the call costings into the program so it would automatically add up all of the costs based on the times of day (peak and off peak charges) and the length of the called and would give you quite an accurate estimate of the amount you had spent on call charges.

Then every three months when my parents phone bill came in I would have to pay them for my usage so I used to keep a jar by the computer and add the amount I had spent to it each week so I knew I had enough to pay for the bill.

I remember the day I heard about BT Surftime, which for a set monthly fee allowed unlimited evening and weekends dialup. Demon quickly added the ability to use surftime into their accounts so I signed up and no longer had to worry about per minute billings. And I think BT got the costs wrong because others I knew were definitely paying 15 a month for surftime, whereas I was only paying 15 every three months. :)

But even with surftime that was quite expensive as I was paying for my Demon dialup account and for the BT surftime addition to my phone connection. It also meant that I couldn't really use the internet in the daytime as I had to still pay per minute until the evenings or the weekend. It meant I tended to stay up longer at night to use it.

I'm so glad Broadband has taken over. So much easier, although with bandwidth capping now in place on most UK ISPs it has taken a step backwards for many, now restricting them during peak daytime and evening periods, which isn't going to ever unleash the full potential that broadband is still being marketed to have. How can you have video over IP if it means using your bandwidth cap up in a couple of hours (especially if the content was in HD!)? They definitely need to sort out and get rid of bandwidth capping soon or they will hurt their own industry.

Stephen Coates
11th May 2007, 13:19
Are there actually that many uncapped services in the UK?

I am thinking of switching my internet connection to F9's cheaper package which allows just about 2GB for 10 a month and then just pay the extra 75p/GB if I need any more. I have hardly used the internet for anything other than looking at 2 or 3 forums, IRC and email and my usage rarly exeeds 2GB. No point in paying for what you don't use.

Submeg
11th May 2007, 14:32
I second that. If you keep advertising that broadband is all excellent, but no one can use it...ppl will get pissed off....

Harrison
11th May 2007, 16:15
Are there actually that many uncapped services in the UK?

I am thinking of switching my internet connection to F9's cheaper package which allows just about 2GB for 10 a month and then just pay the extra 75p/GB if I need any more. I have hardly used the internet for anything other than looking at 2 or 3 forums, IRC and email and my usage rarely exceeds 2GB. No point in paying for what you don't use.

That is a good price if you definitely are not going to need much bandwidth each month. But if you do switch to such a low monthly bandwidth remember you are on it before downloading anything like a Linux distro ;)

As for uncapped services in the UK. There are not many left at all these days and it is getting harder to find them. Business broadband is offered uncapped by some, but you pay a premium for such services. Demon offer uncapped home office broadband which is 25 a month but with mild fair use policies, Pipex offer a similar broadband package but their fair use policies seem stricter, and AOL offer uncapped services but we all know what they are like!

I think some cable services and ADSL2+ connections are uncapped, but you tend to pay more for those and they are only available in some areas.

AlexJ
11th May 2007, 16:30
As for uncapped services in the UK. There are not many left at all these days and it is getting harder to find them. Business broadband is offered uncapped by some, but you pay a premium for such services. Demon offer uncapped home office broadband which is 25 a month but with mild fair use policies, Pipex offer a similar broadband package but their fair use policies seem stricter, and AOL offer uncapped services but we all know what they are like!

The company I had before was uncapped but only 512kb/s speed. I switched to Eclipse about 7/8 months ago who do have a FU policy, but they've never contacted me using despite fairly heavy usage (i.e. uTorrent running most of the time). I guess if it was 24x7 downloading they might get upset.

J T
12th May 2007, 19:04
This telewest (well, Virgin Media) tarriff is (or was) supposedly unlimited. I've certainly never heard anything from them, although my torrenting varies wildly from next to nothing for weeks, then heavy overnight torrenting running at nearly maximum speed and getting gigs and gigs. I use it fairly heavily, but don't rape it 24/7.