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View Full Version : How old were you when you learned to drive?



Stephen Coates
1st November 2007, 12:41
If you can drive, how old were you when you learned to drive, and did you find it hard?

I will be able to start learning to drive in a few months, but I don't really want to. I might have a go in a few years time, but not yet. I think I would find it quite difficult.

AlexJ
1st November 2007, 12:55
I applied for my licence before my 17th birthday so I could go out on my first lesson just a few days after.

I took about 26 hours of lessons before passing. I decided to go totally for lessons with an instructor rather than pick up my parents bad habits.

Harrison
1st November 2007, 13:26
I learnt when I was 20 and passed first time just after my 21st birthday. I had about 20 lessons that were 1.5 hours each, and I had these twice a week, so about 30 hours in total. So I learnt and passed in about 10 weeks.

As for how hard it was, I didn't find it hard at all. Before my first lesson my Dad took me out a few times into the New Forest to an abandoned WWII Air Field called Stoney Cross so I could get used to controlling the car properly and reversing. So when I had my first lesson I didn't need to waste time learning the basics of clutch control, gear changes, steering etc...

And once I passed my Dad gave me his old Austin Metro 1.3L which was OK for a first car, but not a good car to drive by any means. 3 months later I part exchanged it for a Peugeot 405.

I didn't bother learning before then as I couldn't afford the lessons or to run a car, plus I had a free bus pass into Southampton for college so it seemed pointless to spend money on driving at the time. But when I left college I took a year out before starting a design foundation course, so decided it would be good to learn to drive (as I would no longer have a free bus pass the following year). Plus I was coming into some inheritance money at 21 so would then be able to afford a decent car.

I think the best time to learn to drive is when you actually need to be able to drive a car. I don't see the point in learning to drive without any real need. If you have affordable and reliable public transport where you live then there is little point. Only once you have a job that requires you to travel somewhere without easy public transport, or you start to do something that requires being able to carry a lot of stuff. Just learning to drive for the sake of it always seemed a bit pointless to me, although now I couldn't imagine not being able to drive as I would feel restricted as I love driving.

toomanymikes
1st November 2007, 13:39
I was 21 and had about 11 lessons before my 1st test. Failed that cos of my stupidity. Had another 5 lessons and sat my 2nd test. Failed that cos of someone elses stupidity. Had another lesson, sat my 3rd test and passed it no bother. The most important thing is being confident and not getting too disheartened if you fail! You can always sit it again. It does help if you actually want to drive too - if not I imagine that it will be a very nerve wreaking experience. Just think about all the opportunities being able to drive opens up and that ferrari that one day your going to be able to buy - that should give you some motivation!

v85rawdeal
1st November 2007, 13:41
I haven't learnt to drive, because the Stig doesnt do lessons!

Stephen Coates
1st November 2007, 13:42
My parents keep telling me that I should learn to drive as early as possible as it will be harder to learn to drive if I was older. I can't really see the point though.

Public transport here is very good but some places can be quite awkward. A journey which I went on took about 2 hours on public transport (2 busses), but on the way back, I went part of the way in a car which took 10 minutes, and the remaining bus journey was about 20 minutes.

I wouldn't mind having a go at driving, but I think I would be quite scared of driving on anything other than small/quiet roads.

Harrison
1st November 2007, 13:51
That is the point of lessons. To build up your confidence. The thing that worries people the most is controlling the car and that is really the main point of learning to drive. To teach you how to control a car correctly, and what to do on the road. The Driving test is just to show that you can control a car alone and have good observation on the road. You actually learn to drive after you pass your test and are finally out in the car driving on your own.

AlexJ
1st November 2007, 14:01
You could always learn to drive an automatic. I know an auto test means you can't drive a manual, but I believe that over half the people on the roads today would be better suited driving a car with a slushbox. If driving doesn't appeal to you as an enjoyable experience then why trouble yourself with a clutch and gears?

StuKeith
1st November 2007, 14:30
I only past my test last November, at the age of 26! I have however been driving since I was 14.

I mostly used motorbikes as my form of transport, and then when the family came along Reliants.

But the time came that I needed to beable to legally drive real cars. :ninja:

Harrison
1st November 2007, 14:51
So you did have a motorbike licence then? Just not a car one.

J T
1st November 2007, 15:59
I applied for my licence so I could start learning straight away once I was 17.

I found it very tiring at first as there was so much to concentrate on and you are using your hands and feet in completely different ways to that which you are used to. It didn't come naturally to me, but with practice it became a lot easier and before too long was like second nature.

I was taught to drive by my uncle. He was a bit of a c-unit and made out he was doing it cheaply for us (he wasn't). I passed 2nd time. I wouldn't say learing to drive is especially hard, but driving by the very tight constraints required to pass the test can be quite tricky. As Harrison has alluded to, the old adage is that you 'really start learning how to drive after you've passed your test'

If you don't want to do it, don't. I personally couldn't imagine not being able to drive as I do enjoy it and it makes life a lot easier for me - but it's not for everyone.

Harrison
1st November 2007, 17:08
...but it's not for everyone.

I wish the instructors and examiners would tell these people! So many driving that shouldn't be allowed on the roads!

StuKeith
1st November 2007, 19:11
So you did have a motorbike licence then? Just not a car one.

Yes. Pass that when I was 18/19

Buleste
1st November 2007, 19:12
I started riding motorbikes at 16 but didn't learn to drive a car until i was 27 (I was too old to be getting cold and pissed wet through).

Harrison
1st November 2007, 23:51
Now the question is, what car would you choose to buy if you did learn to drive, Steve?

For some strange reason I could picture you actually riding a vintage Moped.

Stephen Coates
2nd November 2007, 09:04
As long as it has a radio/cassette and air conditioning I'd be happy.

Harrison
2nd November 2007, 13:14
Radio/Cassette! Retro as ever! :lol:

So it doesn't matter if the car is rusting to pieces and a nightmare to drive, as long as you are cool inside and can listen to some crackly muffled old music. :thumbs:

TiredOfLife
5th November 2007, 14:30
Never bothered to learn and have no intentions in that direction either.
No drinking and driving = no driving.:D

Puni/Void
7th November 2007, 20:12
I'm actually going to start taking the driver licence next Monday! :cool: Have postponed it for years due to lack of cash, but now it seems like I will be able to finance it (hopefully).
It costs a fortune here in Norway, and I really mean a fortune. :(

Stephen Coates
19th November 2007, 16:34
How much exactly?

I've just been looking at the costs of driving licenses here in England and it looks like it costs £45 for a preliminary license, and about £70 for the theory/practical test. No idea how much lessons would cost.

Do preliminary licenses expire at all? I just thought that when I'm 17 I could possibly get one (£££ permitting) and have a go at driving, but then if I want to put it off for a few years I could have lessons/test then.

Demon Cleaner
19th November 2007, 19:31
Next year in march I have my license for 18 years, half my age :o

Bloodwych
19th November 2007, 20:38
I applied for my provisional as soon as I could, but actually started driving lessons a year later. Can't remember how many I took, probably around 20.

Passed first time but the start of the test was a nightmare! I parked the test vehicle outside the test centre and went in to find the examiner. Upon arriving back at the car, I found some git had blocked me in!

I had to inch forwards and backwards several times to get out onto a busy road; must have taken 5 minutes or so and stalled it once (I saw the examiner putting a line against vehicle control or whatever it is)!

By the time I actually got out and started driving, I think pure rage at being so unlucky drove me on to storm through the test! I was fuming! :D

FOL
21st November 2007, 23:48
He he, got my prvisional at 17, then started lessons a few months after, came to test, flew through test up until the last round about. I pulled out for no apparent reason, failed me instantly, :(.

Ended up loosing my confidense then, 6 tests later, I decided this is the last time, and guess what, my last examiner was my dads old school mate, RESULT!!!!, :).

Sharingan
23rd November 2007, 18:21
Moral of the story is: our dads must get to know more friends who happen to be driving examiners!

Instant success! :thumbs:

Puni/Void
30th November 2007, 20:24
Steve wrote:


How much exactly?

I've just been looking at the costs of driving licenses here in England and it looks like it costs £45 for a preliminary license, and about £70 for the theory/practical test. No idea how much lessons would cost.

Generally, the costs will be like this in Norway.

(Keep in mind that you'll need to have a course first, which involves theory, first aid, and so on, before you are allowed to start taking the drivers license. This is a new rule.) The prices listed are from some of the schools in my district.

- Obligatory course (mentioned above, but including "driving in the dark demonstration): Ca 250£
- One driving lesson (apx. 40-45 mins or something like that): Ca 45-50£
- Obligatory safety course: Ca 300£
- Obligatory safety course in traffic: Ca 550-590£
- Final exam: Ca 60-70£ + rental of car to take the test ca 130£
- Driving on slippery terrain course: ca 70-75£

These are just some of the stuff you'll have to deal with to take the drivers license. It's not seldom that people have to pay around 2000£ or more to get the license. :(

PS: The prices may vary from school to school, but I've tried to make this is a general as possible. So, there might be cheaper or more expensive alternatives. All in all, it's horribly expensive.

Harrison
1st December 2007, 03:59
Ouch! That is much more expensive than in the UK, and we don't have to do any of those parts such as driving in the dark or slippery terrain. But looking at the standard of driving I witness each day I think such tests should be introduced over here!

In the past two days I've seen two very bad accidents. Coming home at about 1am Wednesday night the other side of the motorway was closed and I could see a lot of flashing lights in the distance. When I got closer a car was on it's roof in the centre of the rood and looked like it had bounced off the middle reservation and the other side of the road.

The this evening going to work the traffic as I approached a large roundabout as I left the motorway was backed up, and when I got to the roundabout there was a car with a cover over it, and fire engines and ambulances surrounding it. It's never a good sign when they cover the vehicle up.

Teho
1st December 2007, 05:19
It's never fun to pass by the really serious accidents. One that made an impact on me was years ago, on my way to work early one morning. Early enough to be some time before the morning-rush sets in, but there's still some traffic. Then a car speeds by, going way above the speed limit. And recklessly fast for that road as well. I distinctly remember thinking that when driving like that it'd serve him right to end up in the ditch. I remember that clearly, because that thought came back to haunt me later. Only a couple of kilometers further on his trip ended in the absolute worst case scenario. He'd lost control in a turn, skidded over into the oncoming lane and rammed head-on into a semi at god knows what speed. I mean, he must have been going damn fast to slide out there, the turn isn't that hard and this was a normal dry summer day. The car was just an unrecognisable mess, I could only assume it was the same car because the wreck was the right colour and he'd been driving like a maniac when he passed me. Read in the paper the following day that there'd been three teenagers in that car, the two passengers not even old enough to drive and the driver only having had his license for a few weeks. Needless to say, none of them had a chance. I'm probably never going to forget that day. You hear about these things in the news and shrug them off all the time, but being so close to it certainly leaves a lasting impression.

I can't confirm the exact prices PG is quoting there, but I can say that they definitely sound on the mark. I got my license about eight years ago, and remember spending around £1.200 or so. And I know that the fees associated with getting a license are among those the government just love raising year after year, so..

And I agree Harrison, some of those courses that are mandatory here I think definitely should be everywhere. Especially that slippery terrain one. Without exception, nobody respects a slippery surface properly before they've actually lost control on one. Even when they think they're being careful, they're still going too fast. So the course is designed so that you can do that under controlled conditions. Typically you're being told to maintain a set speed and avoid a couple of obstacles on the track. You're not meant to succeed at this, but they don't tell you that. So you think it looks doable because under normal conditions it'd be dead easy. And of course you fail spectacularily. I think it's great, as that way they give you the eye-opener you need to have to respect a slippery surface properly. The course has some more tests as well such as braking correctly (they disable any anti-lock mechanism on the car for this), and isn't something you can pass or fail, you just need to have been there and done it. So I agree, even though you hardly ever see a very slippery surface where you live I still think this course is something everyone should go through regardless before being allowed on the road.

Stephen Coates
1st December 2007, 11:31
We probably don't get as many slippery surfaces as some countries, but, it only takes a small bit of ice, or a couple of milimeters of snow before there are loads of accidents, massive traffic jams, and reports about it all over the news.

Puni/Void
6th December 2007, 18:22
I can't confirm the exact prices PG is quoting there, but I can say that they definitely sound on the mark. I got my license about eight years ago, and remember spending around £1.200 or so. And I know that the fees associated with getting a license are among those the government just love raising year after year, so..

You're absolutely right, Teho. It gets more expensive every year. The Norwegian government are, as you say, experts in the field of raising taxes. I'm glad I will be finished with the whole thing next year, as it will probably cost even more in the near future.

I actually thought about taking the licence in Sweden, as it's much, much cheaper there. The problem is that the government made some new rules concerning this. The reason was that many Norwegians travelled to Sweden to get the licence. The new law is that you must have lived at least 185 days (or 180) in the country where you are going to take the license.

Submeg
8th December 2007, 11:25
For me, I got my learners when I finished school, got my license in six lessons. Been driving for two years now, no accidents (touch wood). I've had some people almost kill me though, retards who think that pulling out because Im not in front of their car is a good idea. Thank god for Burnout Revenge.

Harrison
8th December 2007, 12:43
And they say games have no practical application in real life! ;)

Drivers definitely seem to be getting worse in the UK recently. So many have no idea how to use roundabouts it is mad, pulling out right across the front of you as you are going around them, indicating for an exit. So many accidents I see are due to this.

Submeg
8th December 2007, 13:03
That is bull, ppl act like idiots at roundabouts....why not wait a bit, save everyone some hassle ey?

Buleste
8th December 2007, 15:02
The problem of bad driving is due to making the cars safer and safer. If you were in a car where you would die if you hit a fly you would drive carefully. Where as if you gave someone an SUV which would survive a nuclear holocaust you don't give a toss about the other drivers on the road as "I'm alright Jack".
I say make cars safer for pedestrians and sod the drivers. Myself included.

Harrison
10th December 2007, 13:17
If a pedestrian is silly enough to be stood in front of my car then that is their own fault!

Stephen Coates
8th January 2008, 11:47
I decided I will have a go at driving and I have sent off an application. The post ofice wanted £3.95 for me to get a postal order to pay for the license and special delivery is about £4.50. I think we need a new Royal Mail topic.

Harrison
8th January 2008, 12:47
Companies do have their own overheads Steve! Post Offices are mostly independently owned franchises that run the Post Office Counter services. They therefore have to pay costs to Royal Mail for everything they do.

Just be glad you didn't need a bankers draft from your bank to buy a car! Then you would be moaning about the £10 they all charge for that service.

Stephen Coates
12th January 2008, 12:39
My driving license arrived today. Anyone fancy being run over by a car? ;)

Have you heard that they have been thinking of increasing the driving age to 21? I think that is a bit silly, as then you will have lots of 21 year olds who are inexperienced with dirivng. I think if they want to reduce the amount of accidents and bad driving, they should make people have more lessons in different environments like rain and on motorways. That way, people will get more experience and practise while being supervised by someone who can tell them if they are doing something wrong.

Buleste
12th January 2008, 12:53
I thought it was limiting the amount of passengers for drivers under the age of 21. At the end of the day until they can get rid of all idiots on the road (which is everyone except me) people will die on them no matter what age. The government would be far better trying to enforce driving bans and making sure that all the cars on the road have valid MOT's and insurance.

AlexJ
13th January 2008, 01:35
I always thought it was pretty ridiculous that the day I passed my test, I could straight away drive on a motorway at night on my own having driven in neither condition before. What you learn during driving lessons is often an 'ideal' way of driving as opposed to the real-world way, but even being given an idea of how three-lane traffic works or some advice on how to deal with driving at night, with someone beside them to explain as things come up would perhaps benefit a lot of novice drivers.

J T
13th January 2008, 09:27
They do (or did) that in the 'pass plus' thing. I did that in the hope of getting cheaper insurance. It didn't really work, but was still quite beneficial to me.

I think it's the extra cost that makes people less inclined to do it.

AlexJ
13th January 2008, 14:09
They do (or did) that in the 'pass plus' thing. I did that in the hope of getting cheaper insurance. It didn't really work, but was still quite beneficial to me.

I think it's the extra cost that makes people less inclined to do it.

True, but that's an optional thing. I think something like the pass plus should be made compulsory prior to being able to drive on motorways/at night/with younger passengers or something. A half-way licence allowing the holder to drive alone during the day on A-roads could be issued after the standard practical test.

Buleste
13th January 2008, 15:45
To be honest if you have a good driving instructor, whilst he can't take you on a motorway, he could take you on a busy dual carraigeway which is similar. And if there are driving conditions that you would like to learn in ask your driving instructor, at worst all he can say is no.

AlexJ
13th January 2008, 20:01
Yeah but my point is that you don't have to do any of this (and as a result many will choose not to) - hence why I believe we have so many crap drivers on the motorway in this country.

Stephen Coates
14th January 2008, 11:58
If they did make special motorway lessons compulsary for people who want to drive on motorways, would there likely be the option of not doing the motorway bit and not driving on them? It's just that I don't like motorways so I wouldn't really want to learn about using them, not would I actually want to use one.

v85rawdeal
14th January 2008, 12:01
I doubt it, otherwise it would not be compulsory. ;) To be honest, it would be best to take that part anyway, just as a precaution.

AlexJ
14th January 2008, 15:26
If they did make special motorway lessons compulsary for people who want to drive on motorways, would there likely be the option of not doing the motorway bit and not driving on them? It's just that I don't like motorways so I wouldn't really want to learn about using them, not would I actually want to use one.


A half-way licence allowing the holder to drive on their own during the day on A-roads could be issued after the standard practical test.

Not that any of this idea exists outside of my own mind, something like this would be far too radical for this government. Instead they'll play it safe and either raise the driving age or keep putting more speed cameras in so they can claim at least that they are trying to reduce road deaths.

Harrison
14th January 2008, 17:11
I actually think increasing the age to 21 would be a good thing. Under 21's tend to be the age group that muck around the most while driving. And if you look at the current youth of today they are not as mature as they were when i took my test, so I think it does need to be raised.

The only problem then is we would have a lot more annoying mopeds around trying to get up hills doing 20MPH with a queue of traffic behind them!

However I do also agree that people should have to do something in their test relating to different road conditions and situations. Maybe a special testing course instead of on real roads, so the conditions for the tests involved are set up specifically to test each element. This could be taken before the final road test.

Harrison
14th January 2008, 17:12
If they did make special motorway lessons compulsary for people who want to drive on motorways, would there likely be the option of not doing the motorway bit and not driving on them? It's just that I don't like motorways so I wouldn't really want to learn about using them, not would I actually want to use one.

I never understand why people dislike motorways or refuse to drive on them. Motorway driving is 100 times easier than driving on any other road!

Buleste
14th January 2008, 17:20
What i find stupid is at the same time they are thinking about raising the driving age to 21 the government is thinking about lowering the voting age to 16. So at 18 you won't be able to drive yourself to work but you will be able to vote for the leader of the country and potentially affect the world. Genius.

Stephen Coates
14th January 2008, 19:17
If they did make special motorway lessons compulsary for people who want to drive on motorways, would there likely be the option of not doing the motorway bit and not driving on them? It's just that I don't like motorways so I wouldn't really want to learn about using them, not would I actually want to use one.

I never understand why people dislike motorways or refuse to drive on them. Motorway driving is 100 times easier than driving on any other road!

It is bad enough being in a car on a motorway with a competant driver, let alone driving on one myself.

v85rawdeal
16th January 2008, 12:30
Just remember the following:

NEVER SAY TO A COP

1. I can't reach my license unless you hold my beer.

2. Sorry, Officer, I didn't realize my radar detector wasn't plugged in.

3.Aren't you the guy from the Village People?

4. Hey, you must've been doin' about 125 mph to keep up with me. Good job!

5. Are You Andy or Barney?

6. I thought you had to be in relatively good physical condition to be a police officer.

7. You're not gonna check the trunk, are you?

8. I pay your salary!

9. Gee, officer! That's terrific. The last officer only gave me a warning, too!

10. Do you know why you pulled me over? Okay, just so one of us does.

11. I was trying to keep up with traffic. Yes, I know there are no other cars around. That's how far ahead of me they are.

12. When the officer says "Gee. Your eyes look red, have you been drinking?" You probably shouldn't respond with,"Gee Officer your eyes look glazed, have you been eating doughnuts

Buleste
16th January 2008, 12:36
13. Will you let me off for a doughnut?

Demon Cleaner
17th January 2008, 13:11
14. The girl I slept with yesterday had a photo of yours on her bedside table.

Buleste
17th January 2008, 13:16
15. Is that a truncheon or are you just pleased to see me?

16. What do you use those rubber gloves for anyway?

J T
18th January 2008, 13:52
Reminds me of the punchline of a joke:



"Why didn't you stop?"

Sorry, officer, my wife ran off with a policeman.....


I thought you were bringing her back.

Stephen Coates
20th March 2008, 17:06
Finally had a driving lesson today. Didn't seem as bad at it as I thought I would be. Just need plenty of practise I suppose.

Harrison
20th March 2008, 18:09
The most important thing to remember is that you should always feel in control of the car. Don't let the car drive you. Passing your test is really just showing that you have complete control of the car, and that you understand the rules of the road and have good observation of other drivers on the road. Observation is the biggest factor in passing your test.

I hope your lessons go well and good luck once you get to taking your driving test.

Puni/Void
6th April 2008, 13:05
Good luck with the driving lessons, Steve! Hope you are doing fine and that you are enjoying it. I can't give you any pointers though, as I'm taking lessons myself. I'm really looking forward to the day that I can drive though. That's especially because of work.

Stephen Coates
6th April 2008, 13:27
Thanks.

I havn't crashed it, yet.

v85rawdeal
6th April 2008, 13:38
Famous last words...

my_lo
21st June 2008, 19:16
I was 25 and my mother almost forced me, i hated it. It took me 4 times before i succeeded and still now, i'm a real danger on the road.

Harrison
23rd June 2008, 11:06
@Steve

How are the driving lessons going? Have you taken your test yet?

Stephen Coates
23rd June 2008, 13:03
Test? I've only been aving lessons for a couple of months?

I'm getting better though.

Buleste
23rd June 2008, 13:08
Remember flashing your lights and tooting your horn at fit women is perfectly acceptable.;)

Harrison
23rd June 2008, 15:45
Test? I've only been aving lessons for a couple of months?

I'm getting better though.

I only had 13 weeks of lessons before passing my test first time, so I thought you must be getting close to thinking about your test by now.

How many lessons have you had so far? Are you becoming more confident driving a car?

Stephen Coates
23rd June 2008, 17:57
Test? I've only been aving lessons for a couple of months?

I'm getting better though.

I only had 13 weeks of lessons before passing my test first time, so I thought you must be getting close to thinking about your test by now.

How many lessons have you had so far? Are you becoming more confident driving a car?

I've had about 12 or 13 now. I am not remotely close to wanting to do the test. If I were to have any chance of passing the test now, the examiner would have to be extremely lenient.

Harrison
24th June 2008, 10:01
When I had lessons they were 1.5 hours long. This meant the extra half an hour was used to get where we needed to be, leaving a whole hour to actually start practising driving skills. Plus I had two lessons a week. Therefore in reality I had 26 lessons of 1.5 hours before taking my test. So 39 hours (they recommend about 40 hours minimum to learn).

Demon Cleaner
24th June 2008, 10:10
I only had 14 hours before I took the test, the minimum you must have here was 12 hours at that time, that was back in 1989. Nowadays you need more hours. And I succeeded the test the first time.

Harrison
24th June 2008, 10:40
What do they include in the driving tests in Luxembourg?

In the UK when I took the test we had to do a visual number plate test to prove your eye sight was ok then answer 3 random questions from the highway code, then during the test you had to do parallel parking, a three point turn, reversing around a corner, emergency stop, using a roundabout, merging into traffic from a side junction, correctly turning right at an intersection, and at traffic lights, and then some general driving and following directions.

These days they have added a written test you need to take before you can then take your practical test, and I think they have added more to the actual test now too.

I was just trying to think what year I took my test. I had just turned 21 so it must have been January 1994, so I've been driving for 14 years now. I hadn't bothered learning to drive until then because I had a free student bus pass to get to college and into the local cities.

Demon Cleaner
24th June 2008, 11:18
These days they have added a written test you need to take before you can then take your practical test, and I think they have added more to the actual test now too.
Same in Luxembourg, you have to take a written test, and if you succeed, you can begin your driving lessons. And at that time you needed at least 12 hours of practical test, which wasn't a lot, but this has now changed.

Stephen Coates
24th June 2008, 14:17
My lessons are an hour each. I tend to do it every two weeks and sometimes every week. Too expensive to do it any more regularly.

I think the theory test used to be about 30 questions, but has since been increased to 50.

Harrison
24th June 2008, 14:20
How much are driving lessons these days? I think mine cost £13 for 1.5 hours.

Stephen Coates
24th June 2008, 14:26
My driving lessons are £17 per hour.

Puni/Void
26th June 2008, 13:11
In Norway you pay about apx. £50 per hour. Yes, it's horribly expensive. :(

Buleste
26th June 2008, 13:17
I wouldn't want to teach someone to drive in the snow so i'd have a low summer rate then in winter crank the prices up if i was in Scandenavia.

Harrison
26th June 2008, 13:34
In Norway you pay about apx. £50 per hour. Yes, it's horribly expensive. :(

Wow! How does anyone ever afford to take lessons?

I bet you wish you had learnt to drive whilst you were over here in the UK?

Teho
26th June 2008, 17:07
Can't confirm today's prices, but the lessons cost over £30 when I took them. And that's nine years ago now.

Look, basically anything and I do mean anything that has even remotely to do with cars has wild taxes attached to it here. And only a fragment of this is actually used for road maintenance and such, most goes to completely different areas. These car taxes are a major source of income for the government here, so cars and anything to do with driving is just stupidly expensive. That's just the way it is here.

Harrison
26th June 2008, 17:54
How much is petrol over there at the moment? More expensive than the UK? Petrol is currently about £1.19 per litre, and Diesel about £1.32 per litre.

Teho
26th June 2008, 18:12
Roughly the same here, fluctuates between £1.20 and £1.40. We used to be a lot more exspensive than the rest of the world on fuel as well, but the big increases in fuel prices over the last year didn't affect us much (the plus side of producing your own oil). So nowadays the rest of the world has caught up with the price level we always were at. ;)

I can give you another example on cars and their cost though. You know my car, a CitroŽn Xantia 1.9 TDI estate? When I bought it, it was ten years old and had run 215.000 km. I bought it for £6.000, and I consider that a very good buy (actually, the buy cost alone was only about £5.300, the associated fees brought it up to around £6.000)

Harrison
27th June 2008, 00:48
That is expensive. A 10 year old Xantia would probably be worth about £1500 at most in the UK. Our cars are expensive to buy new, but quickly devalue once they are a couple of years old.