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Tiago
25th October 2007, 11:05
01 2008 Australian Grand Prix (Melbourne) 14 - 16 Mar
02 2008 Malaysian Grand Prix (Kuala Lumpur) 21 - 23 Mar
03 2008 Bahrain Grand Prix (Bahrain) 04 - 06 Apr
04 2008 Spanish Grand Prix (Catalunya) 25 - 27 Apr
05 2008 Turkish Grand Prix (Istanbul) 09 - 11 May
06 2008 Monaco Grand Prix (Monte Carlo) 22 - 25 May
07 2008 Canadian Grand Prix (Montreal) 06 - 08 Jun
08 2008 French Grand Prix (Magny-Cours) 20 - 22 Jun
09 2008 British Grand Prix (Silverstone) 04 - 06 Jul
10 2008 German Grand Prix (Hockenheim) 18 - 20 Jul
11 2008 Hungarian Grand Prix (Budapest) 01 - 03 Aug
12 2008 European Grand Prix (Valencia) 22 - 24 Aug
13 2008 Belgian Grand Prix (Spa-Francorchamps) 05 - 07 Sep
14 2008 Italian Grand Prix (Monza) 12 - 14 Sep
15 2008 Singapore Grand Prix (Singapore) 26 - 28 Sep
16 2008 Japanese Grand Prix (Fuji Speedway) 10 - 12 Oct
17 2008 Chinese Grand Prix (Shanghai) 17 - 19 Oct
18 2008 Brazilian Grand Prix (Sao Paulo) 31 Oct - 02 Nov


I never support the idea of having 2 grand prix in the same country...:mad:
In 2008:
04 2008 Spanish Grand Prix (Catalunya) 25 - 27 Apr
12 2008 European Grand Prix (Valencia) 22 - 24 Aug

It happend before, Germany as example.

It's stupid !!!:mad: Why in the same country?
Why a European grand prix?

With so many good circuits , why f1 needs 2 races in the same country?
Why not Portugal-Estoril that has a fantastic circuit?
Argentina? South-Africa? Anyone remember Cayalami? Great circuit
And so many other.... is it so difficult to make a deal with these countrys ????

Why do they have a race in Monaco that is the most dangerous track in the world?
ok, ok, it's the oldest track, the money, bla bla bla....
But Spain...2 tracks...dont tell me that spain pays a lot o money... ia sure others would pay even more....

Harrison
25th October 2007, 12:11
That is true, but the FIA track regulations have become very strict in recent years and a track has to spend a lot of money to pass these regulations. Many of the great tracks that F1 used to use just don't meet these standards any longer and would require more money than the track's owners can afford to bring them up to the date.

It does however seem a little strange to host two races in the same country when you consider how many countries are trying to get into the F1 calendar at the moment. But with countries such as India and Russia currently designing/building new circuits we should see some new tracks the following few seasons.

My only other thoughts is that many emerging markets such as China have recently joined the calendar and having races so far from the UK (the central location for more F1 teams) costs the teams a lot of money to go to. Having more races centred in Europe greatly reduce these costs.

One thing that will be good in 2008 is the banning of traction control. We should then see who can really drive a car as the on board computers won't be able to get them out of trouble as easily. Jenson Button has already said that the 2008 Honda without traction control is for him a much nicer car to drive as it suits his driving style better.

Tiago
25th October 2007, 12:29
You right Harrison.

I think they should try to put european GP in other country:

Portugal - We have a great circuit, it's fine for MotogP, FIA GT, etc.... we did everything FIA asked for, last thing was PITs size, we had to enlarge the pits, we did it, they are big enought, the track is saffety, so i dont get it... whats the problem...
Holland - they have a great circuit too.
Austria - another one.
Czech republic - another great circuit
Sweden - it host the f1 before... the track is also good

and so on...

Harrison
25th October 2007, 12:44
I used to like the A1-Ring in Austria. That always saw some great races, but it was removed from the calendar after 2003. And I just looked it up and discovered that all of the grandstands and pit buildings were demolished in 2004 which seems quite mad, as this instantly rendered the track unusable for any motorsport. And since this the track has just been sitting unused and has gone into disrepair.

Red Bull Racing now own the circuit but have not done anything with it.

AlexJ
25th October 2007, 13:30
The 2nd race in Spain is down to the emerging market for F1 in Spain due to Alonso's two titles (at least it was at the time it was agreed). We had 2 German GP's for years while Schumi was around and two GP's in Italy because of Ferrari's popularity.

One track I'd love to see on the calendar is Laguna Seca in the USA, but the walls are quite close to the track and therefore it's probably not considered safe enough to race on (not much more dangerous than Canada IMO, but that was criticised by some earlier this year for being too dangerous).


My only other thoughts is that many emerging markets such as China have recently joined the calendar and having races so far from the UK (the central location for more F1 teams) costs the teams a lot of money to go to. Having more races centred in Europe greatly reduce these costs.

These costs are paid for under the Concorde Agreement. Looking the other way, the championship is the World Championship as opposed to the European Championship and it is often criticised for being too Europe-centric.

Tiago
25th October 2007, 13:48
Ok, so, by that way of ideas, we could have 2 races in UK, many teams are from UK.

Donington park is a fine circuit, better then valencia in spain.
I thinks there is also a good circuit, brands heach, is this the name?

The most irritating thing for me is that Barcelona track was a 30% copy of Estoril circuit... Estoril was one of the drivers favorite (just like Spa)...
But sure, we are a small country... no F1 pilots... less money...

I read somewhere that we cound organize such an event... really? What about MotoGP?
FIA GT? Expo 98? the Expos after this one, follows the same organization rules.... Euro 2004? It was one of the best so far (organization) .... not to mention boot races... golf .... etc...

i just dont get it...

Harrison
25th October 2007, 14:13
One track I'd love to see on the calendar is Laguna Seca in the USA, but the walls are quite close to the track and therefore it's probably not considered safe enough to race on (not much more dangerous than Canada IMO, but that was criticised by some earlier this year for being too dangerous).

That is a great track and they keep saying they need more tracks in the US. Isn't Laguna Seca used in the US Le Mans racing series? That left hand bend over the brow of a hill is quite evil. Isn't it called The Corkscrew?




My only other thoughts is that many emerging markets such as China have recently joined the calendar and having races so far from the UK (the central location for more F1 teams) costs the teams a lot of money to go to. Having more races centred in Europe greatly reduce these costs.

These costs are paid for under the Concorde Agreement. Looking the other way, the championship is the World Championship as opposed to the European Championship and it is often criticised for being too Europe-centric.

What costs does that actually cover? I've heard many times about how much it costs the teams to fly the equipment and support staff out to each location, and the extra technical expenses involved with data communication.

It is true that F1 should be worldwide, but you have to remember that until recently many countries, especially in the Middle East were not interested or financially able to take part until the past couple of years where they are now suddenly seeing F1 as a good way to expand business connections and industry with the rest of the world.

Harrison
25th October 2007, 14:17
Ok, so, by that way of ideas, we could have 2 races in UK, many teams are from UK.

Donington park is a fine circuit, better then valencia in spain.
I thinks there is also a good circuit, brands heach, is this the name?

Nearly right. It's Brands Hatch, and is located just outside of London. It is indeed a great circuit and F1 did originally race there, but the track isn't big enough for modern F1 cars. They just wouldn't be able to take advantage of the cars there.

A1GP race there though and I saw the first ever A1GP race there. That was really good and they had made a lot of improvements to the track for that event.

As for more races in the UK because of the teams, that would be great (especially for those of us living in the UK), but it tends to focus more on the country of the popular drivers rather than the teams (unless you count Ferrari).

Tiago
25th October 2007, 14:27
yes,

another thing that makes me whant to kill those €@ !!:mad: is that they said before that Estoril didnt have the safety conditions for F1 to race there !!
What a fu#$ ?! :rant: and Monaco? Does it have? And Valencia (street race) does it have? stupid f1 bosses :guns2: go to hell:firedevil:

Harrison
25th October 2007, 14:36
In the end it all comes down to money. If a country/track owner/sponsor of a track can hand over more cash than any other then they will secure the race. Look at Bahrain! They didn't have a track when Bernie signed the deal, but they DID have the money.

I think once Bernie leaves F1 (he is old, he can't have long to live!) we could see a big change in how it is controlled and run. He is a business man who controls it purely from a financial point of view, not the fans point of view.

Tiago
25th October 2007, 14:39
Yes yo are right, but, if fans are not happy, if they dont see F1, there is not return in money....
so they should keep fans satisfied...

Harrison
25th October 2007, 14:48
We both know that is true, but to the FIA money is their biggest concern and they don't seem that bothered by fans. Well... that is until they don't get any turning up at races. Look at the situation a few years ago where some races were a complete disaster with the US GP being nearly empty and some other races not able to sell tickets. At least with the current drivers it has been attracting fans, both old and new, back to the races. And this year with all of the controversy has actually helped the sport become a lot more popular.

AlexJ
25th October 2007, 21:58
I think once Bernie leaves F1 (he is old, he can't have long to live!) we could see a big change in how it is controlled and run. He is a business man who controls it purely from a financial point of view, not the fans point of view.

It could make things worse. Despite being there to make money, Bernie also knows his racing having entered GP, owned teams and managed drivers. Money is his no.1 priority but he knows there are occasions when short-term gain could mean a net-loss long term with fans deserting. After he's gone, the banks might be in charge and then it will be 100% money making - no thought at all spared for the fans.


What costs does that actually cover? I've heard many times about how much it costs the teams to fly the equipment and support staff out to each location, and the extra technical expenses involved with data communication..

2 race cars, 10,000kg of air freight and 20 people. Bridgestone cover the cost of flying the tyres out.

Harrison
25th October 2007, 22:39
I would imagine that most teams take more than that to the race weekend though. What about their third "spare" car for one?

AlexJ
26th October 2007, 14:23
I would imagine that most teams take more than that to the race weekend though. What about their third "spare" car for one?

Each team also gets a 4.2% share of the TV revenue providing they attend every GP. By expanding the worldwide appeal of the sport, more TV stations take coverage, resulting in increased TV revenue which the teams get a cut of. This probably makes it cost effective to do the flyaways.

Harrison
26th October 2007, 15:00
I bet that share in the TV revenue makes bernie cry! :lol:

Buleste
15th March 2008, 15:33
Come on anyone except Ferrari (Although i will allow Massa get a couple of points)and Alonso (who is a whinging pussy).

StuKeith
16th March 2008, 10:56
DC made a nice outburst to Louise goodman this morning in the race after massa took him out! :D

AlexJ
16th March 2008, 16:18
DC made a nice outburst to Louise goodman this morning in the race after massa took him out! :D

Yeah, noticed they'd cut it out of the re-run (can't think why). It was something along the lines of "He better apologize or I'll knock three shades of s**t of of the little b**tard" What is it with these Red Bull drivers and swearing on TV?

Buleste
16th March 2008, 20:09
They've got wings.